ALL Victorian school names AND numbers

Just after Christmas we added a major index to the Geelong & District Database.

In the database, you can search for any Victorian school [pre 1975] by number OR [part] name.  And of course if they are schools in the Geelong district you may find more than just the new entries from Vision and Realisation.

You also have a second option – rather than searching our database, you can download PDF files by name or number from the Genealogical Society of Victoria blog site.  These lists now cover Volume 2 and Volume 3 – the complete list from Vision and Realisation.

The lists include the school name, school number, region, volume number and page number in Vision and Realisation.

Enjoy!

Victorian school names and numbers

Moolap School c1911A major index that’s been added to the Geelong & District Database covers a little more than our region – in fact it covers all of Victoria.  You can search for any Victorian school [pre 1975] by number or [part] name.  And of course if they are schools in the Geelong district you may find more than just the new entries from Vision and Realisation.  You also have a second option – rather than searching our database, you can download PDF files by name or number from the Genealogical Society of Victoria blog site.  At this stage these lists only cover Volume 2, however in 2013 these will be merged with the entries from Volume 3.

This is the list of additions since 3 November making a total of 1,310,415 entries in the database:

  • School Numbers and School Names from Vision and Realisation vols 2 & 3 [Books] – 6,871 entries
  • South Geelong Primary School No. 2143: centenary 1879-1979 [Book] – 459 entries
  • Souvenir of the centenary celebration of the Presbytery of Geelong, 1959 [Book] – 685 entries
  • St Paul’s Church Geelong: historical survey 1854-1979 [Book] – 352 entries

Details on these indexes can be found in the Geelong & District Potpourri pages.

And don’t forget to search again for your ancestors in the Geelong & District Database – they could have been in the last load of additions!

Not that hard: visiting the Genealogical Society of Victoria

If you think that you need to be a member to visit the Genealogical Society of Victoria [GSV] hopefully this blog will encourage you to visit and find out the facts first hand.  The other misconception some people have is that the Society’s resources are limited to Victoria.  In fact the society has wonderful resources for researching ancestors from around the world.

Explore the web site of the GSV to find out all the details: opening times, services, activities, events, bookshop, catalogue and much more. 

This blog isn’t about repeating the information on the GSV web site – it’s aimed at making you feel comfortable about dropping in for a visit.

WHERE:

Level B1, 257 Collins Street, Melbourne

HOW TO FIND THE GSV:

The GSV is located in Emirates House on the south side of Collins Street between Swanston and Elizabeth Streets.  Australia on Collins is almost opposite and Emirates House is just a few doors towards Swanston Street from the pedestrian crossing lights.  [below left and centre]

Go through the sliding glass entrance doors of Emirates House.  [below right]

 
     

Once you are in the foyer, DON’T go past the escalators!  Turn LEFT immediately before the jewellers on the left – the lifts are behind the jeweller’s shop.  Press the DOWN button and when you’re in the lift select “B1″.  [below left]

Emirates House runs between Collins Street and Flinders Lane.  If you are coming from the Flinders Street Railway Station, you can enter the building at rear – 257 Flinders Lane.  [below centre]

When you come out of the lift at level B1 you will see the GSV sign in the foyer.  [below right]

 
     

WHAT YOU’LL FIND AT THE GSV:

Turn left down the corridor – and pause to look at the wonderful family charts on the wall.  There are also photos of all the GSV’s presidents.  [below left]

At the end of the corridor is reception and the bookshop.  Allow plenty of time to browse the wonderful selection of books, CDs, charts, genealogy programs, vouchers and much more.  Have a look at the online GSV bookshop to get an idea of the huge range available … and if what you want is not in stock the GSV may be able to get it in for you.  [below right]

 
   

USING THE LIBRARY:

Prospective members may have a brief tour of the library if the staff or volunteers are available.You do not need to be a member of the GSV to use the library – there are day rates and also reciprocal rights for members of nominated interstate societies.  Ask at the reception desk to check the options for you.

Visitors and members are required to wear their name tags or membership cards at all times in the library. 

No bags are permitted in the library – these should be placed in one of the lockers provided.  Clear plastic bags are permitted for your research papers.

Only pencils are permitted in the library – if you don’t have one, you can borrow one from the library information desk.

Members should scan the barcode on their card when they first arrive at the library and at the end of the day when they leave.  [below left and right]

 
 

 

LIBRARY FACILITIES and RESOURCES:

The information and enquiry desk is the first point of call – this is where you book computers and film readers, ask for assistance and advice on using the catalogue and doing your research, and collect your printing and copying.  [below left]

Bookings must be made for using the computers and film readers as there are time limits and specific machines are allocated depending on your area and type of research.  [below centre and right]

All monitors have been upgraded to flat screens providing greater desk-space for everyone.  [below right]

 
     

You will also need to book microfilm readers and should check with the information desk on procedures for using microfiche.  [below left]

Many resources are still available on microfiche and microfilm and the GSV holds an extensive collection.  [below centre]

In addition to the film printer, the GSV has a Scanpro film and fiche scanner and printer – digital images can also be saved to USB drives from this equipment.  Check with the information desk to book the Scanpro for short-term use.  [below right]

 
     

OTHER FACILITIES:

The GSV meeting room is used for the Thursday lunchtime talks, computer classes, courses and various special interest groups.  It includes full data projection and audio equipment.  Check the GSV web site for information on all activities.  [below left]

You can plan a full day at the GSV – bring your own lunch or make use of the numerous food outlets nearby.  There is a kitchen with tea & coffee making facilities.  Relax and chat with other library users in the lunch area.  [below right]

 
 

 

There is so much to see and do at the Genealogical Society of Victoria – don’t be afraid to visit and find out what you’re missing!

Vision and Realisation – Index to Volume 2

Most Victorian researchers will be familiar with the 3-volume set of Vision and Realisation - it’s a wonderful resource for anyone researching schools in Victoria.  They were compiled by regional teachers and historians to commemorate the centenary of the Education Department of Victoria in 1973.  They provide a short history of every school that was a part of the Victorian Education system – some quite brief and others more comprehensive.

Volume 1 is extensively indexed.  Volumes 2 & 3 are indexed by school name only.

Some years ago the Geelong Family History Group indexed Volume 2 which included the Barwon Region [Geelong and surrounding area] together with virtually all of western Victoria.  This index included all people mentioned – a large number of these were teachers.  The GFHG Index has now been added to the Geelong & District database for searching and includes 12,040 entries.  NOTE: the school names have not been re-indexed as ALL schools are included in the original volumes - should you wish to research a school you need to access the Vision and Realisation volumes which are available at many societies and libraries throughout Victoria.

Volume 2 covers:

  • Glenelg Region
  • Wimmera Region, including the sub-regions of Stawell; Dimboola, Losan and Kaniva; Donald, Dunmunkle and Warracknabeal; Horsham and Arapiles
  • Mallee Region
  • Loddon Region
  • Central Highlands Region
  • Corangamite Region
  • Barwon Region

For general information …

Volume 1 covers:

  • Origins and foundations
  • The Common Schools period
  • Free, Compulsory and Secular
  • The Primary Division
  • The Secondary Division
  • The Technical Division
  • The Education and Supply of Teachers
  • Special Services
  • A Complex of Organisations
  • The Teacher and the Community
  • Current Trends
  • Educational Personnel

Volume 3 covers:

  • Port Phillip Western Region
  • Port Phillip Eastern Region
  • Upper Goulburn Region
  • Goulburn Region
  • Upper Murray Region
  • East Gippsland Region
  • West Gippsland Region

Many thanks to the Geelong Family History Group for this wonderful resource

Not that hard: Victorian Land Memorials [old General Law titles]

Bound Memorials

Bound registers in the Memorials Library, Melbourne

This blog will guide you through the steps to find a Victorian Land Memorial – follow the footsteps of your guide – Joan Hunt – who kindly took the photographs and demonstrated this procedure to the Geelong & District Historical Association quarterly meeting – February 12, 2011.

This guide is the start of a series called “Not that hard!” – hopefully it will help you realise that it’s not that hard to find a Memorial at the Registrar-General’s Office in Melbourne.

Of course there is no guarantee that you will find a Memorial for YOUR ancestor, but if it’s there, this guide should help you find it.

WHERE:

Memorials Library at Marland House
10th Floor
570 Bourke Street, Melbourne, Vic 3000

ABOUT:

General Law Titles – some background information

ACCESS:

Take the lift to the tenth floor.  On leaving the lift note that there are glass doors both to the left and to the right.  Note the glass door with “Registrar-General’s Office” marked on it and enter.

You will pay $2.00 per hour per person. [Fee applicable Feb 2011 - obviously this amount could change in the future.]

At the counter ask for a pass into the Memorials Library, and also ask for a photocopying card.  You will use the card to access the photocopy machine but not pay until the end of your visit.

Return past the lifts and enter the opposite glass doors.  Immediately through the doors on your left is a door labelled Memorials Library - use your pass to gain entry.

In the Memorials Library you will find the bound Memorials of the conveyance (or lease or other Instrument) of land under the General or Old Law, relating to land granted by the Crown between 1838 and 1862.  The Torrens System of land registration was introduced on 2 October 1862.

NOTE: Numbers in [brackets] refer to images in the image gallery below.

LAYOUT:

Walk ahead to the compactus and note the photocopier against the wall to your right [No 2], and to your left benches along the middle of the room stretching the full extent of the row of compactus [Nos 3, 8 & 9].

Behind the benches in shelves against the wall are volumes bound in brown cloth, hardcovers, alphabetically labelled, and clearly designated Second Series. [Nos 4 & 5]

At the end of them, next to the Z volume, there are two white-cloth covered bound volumes A-K and L-A which are labelled First Series. [Nos 5 & 6]

SEARCH:

The search is in three stages.  Our example is a search for Edmond BUCKLEY who had land interests on the coast near Cobden in the 1850s, hence we will search the FIRST SERIES.

FIRST SERIES: covers the years 1838 to 1859
SECOND SERIES: covers later years with some overlap

STAGE 1:

First you must consult the indexes in the wall shelves. [No 5]
In Series One Nominal or Name Index, Volume 1 A-K was searched for Edmond BUCKLEY [No 6].
In the columns to the left for Edmond BUCKLEY:
Book 44, Number 392. [No 7]
NOTE: If you can’t read the details there are “reserve” copies of these volumes – you made need to ask for them.

STAGE 2:

Consult the Series One volumes under the benches using the Book and Number found in STAGE 1. [Nos 8 & 9]
These white-cloth covered bound volumes are all labelled in black writing.  These are the numerical indexes which give a page full of details of land transactions of a particular person – in this case we select Book 44 and Folio or Page Number 392. [No 10]

There were three entries for Edmond BUCKLEY: [No 10]

  • Book 46, No 614 – Patrick COADY – Woranga part por 15
  • Book 63, No 319 – Patrick COADY – Woranga pt sec 15
  • Book 64, No 267 – J A GOOLD – Woranga pt sec 16

In this case the first entry is chosen to view the Memorial of the Transaction (or Instrument as it is usually known).

STAGE 3:

Go to the compactus for Series One – they are arranged in numerical order – select Book 46.
Take the Memorial Book to the bench and open it at Page (or Folio) 614. [No 11]

The Memorial (Book 46, No 614) shows that it is a Conveyance. [No 12]
Edmond BUCKLEY and Patrick COADY are the two parties involved and the date is 10 March 1857.
There is also a witness name.

The right hand side of the document describes fully the land being conveyed – sometimes, if it is a hotel for instance, it may well state that the transaction contains the wooden building of eight rooms known as the King’s Arms Hotel and the outbuildings and stables attached, or something similar.  General there is no description of buildings.
At the right is the amount of money paid by the one party to the other. [No 13]

At the lower left of the Memorial is Edmond BUCKLEY’s signature. [No 14] 

SECOND SERIES SEARCH:

Follow the same procedure as for FIRST SERIES but using the volumes identified as SECOND SERIES.

PHOTO GALLERY:

BACKGROUND:

Joan learnt these procedures some years ago when she attended a Summer School run by the Royal Historical Society of Victoria.  Check to see if societies in your area run similar programs or courses.

The above guide was valid as at 12 Feb 2011 – you should always check that procedures and/or rules have not changed in the meantime.  Information should be available from the Land Titles Office.

Place Names in Vic BDM Indexes

This topic began as a local Geelong and District issue however it was obviously relevant to all of Victoria.

There are a multitude of web sites that give you lists of the infamous abbreviations of Place Names in the Victorian BDM Indexes however there are far too many places with similar names that could fit the abbreviation to make it more than guess work.

The tips and examples in this Place Names in Vic BDM Indexes web page can take most of the guesswork out of the puzzle.

At this stage I believe the cut-off date for using this method is about 1964 – when BDM registration became fully centralised and entries were no longer added in groups from each registration district across the state – more work needed to confirm this!

Unlock the Past Victorian Expo (Geelong)

This is so exciting – after some months of planning it’s now a reality and a MUST for your diary! Friday 2nd and Saturday 3rd September 2011.

A major history-genealogy-heritage event for all Victoria.

See our Geelong & District Calendar & Events.

And for full details and future information on the program, bookings etc. make sure you bookmark the Unlock the Past Victorian Expo (Geelong) web site.

Groups from throughout our region will be there in force with all their expertise and local knowledge.  And of course it will be a chance for you to meet some of our wonderful volunteers who have provided so much to the Geelong & District Database.

And of course it’s not limited to our region as all the major Melbourne and Victorian groups and organisations will be invited to participate in the EXPO – that’s why it’s called the “Victorian Expo”!

We’re thrilled with the venue – lots of free car parking, 2 minutes from the North Geelong station, easy access from Melbourne, and of course we haven’t forgotten our friends from the east side of Port Phillip Bay – why not enjoy a lovely trip across the bay on the Sorrento-Queenscliff ferry?

Of course there’ll be heaps of announcements between now and the EXPO so put the dates in your diary and keep your eyes and ears open!

Look forward to seeing you there.

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