Geelong Advertiser: WWI years

Geelong Advertiser 8th June 1918I hope everyone has been keeping tabs on the National Library of Australia / TROVE additions!  If not, you will have missed the start of the 1914-1918 copies of the Geelong Advertiser appearing.

So far the uploads include part of 1917 and 1918 – keep watching and DON’T FORGET to register and do your bit by correcting as many entries as possible to make it easier for others to find their families.

Thank you to the State Library of Victoria and the National Library of Australia – where would we be without them?

I must confess to smirking last Thursday – sitting in the audience listening to an American genealogist – he was SO jealous of our NLA digital newspapers and TROVE!

THE biggest news for Geelong and district

CelebrateI confess – I screamed, I laughed, I shouted for joy, and yes … I was close to tears!  I had just heard the most fantastic news for all local and family history researchers in our region – and I have permission to do this blog.

Some of you who have followed this blog and our mailing list over the years will know how hard we have worked, grovelled and pleaded to get the Geelong Advertiser digitised and available through TROVE.  We eventually succeeded in November last year with the Addy online up to 1856.  We were warned not to expect many more years in a hurry.

At this very moment I’m sitting at the VAFHO State Family History Conference in Ballarat – about to give my talk titled Regional Victoria: a goldfields experience.  At the same time Jenny Higgins from National Library Australia is presenting her paper More than Gold: Treasure from TROVE.  Jenny had asked for an “Announcement” to include in her presentation.  And I had THE most exciting chat with Jenny and I have her permission to post this blog as soon as we’ve both finished our presentations.

You MUST have guessed by now that the exciting news is about the Geelong Advertiser but it’s even better than that!  The Addy will be included in the 1914-1918 papers digitised in the next financial year [July 2013 – June 2014] … AND …

In the same group, the Addy will be digitised from 1857 to 1913.  You heard me!  NOW you understand why I’m so excited!

The Addy will be online from 1840-1918 .. that warrants a BIG celebration!!!!!!!!!!

Copulation Register

Copulation RegisterIt’s true – I’m not pulling your leg!

For full details have a look at the GSV blog Genealogy World!

Geelong Advertiser … THANK YOU!

It is definitely an early Christmas present – our heartfelt thanks to the National Library of Australia and the State Library of Victoria.  This is what we were promised initially:

And they’ve added a bonus!

As reported in the recent blog, there were lots of very large gaps for the digitised images.  There were 913 issues digitised and online with 1,600 still to come.

I haven’t had time to check them all yet but I have checked up to Wed 31 Dec 1851 and so far all have digitised images.  BUT it appears that we might have ALL of them up to 9 Aug 1856 searchable and digitised!

We know there are still some missing individual issues that we hope will be tracked down and included but apart from those, we can now search and view the Geelong Advertiser [under its various titles] from the FIRST issue 21 November 1840 through to 9 August 1856.  That’s 2,844 issues online!

We really do owe the National Library of Australia and the State Library of Victoria a huge Thank You!

Michael Gandy in Melbourne … update

In less than a week Michael Gandy will be speaking on the first of two days when Melburnians will be able to experience one of the best genealogical speakers in the world!

Important information about locations, access and bookings can be found on the Genealogical Society of Victoria blog.

Personally I’m looking forward to these presentations immensely – it’s not often that we get such a wonderful opportunity right here in Melbourne!

Geelong Advertiser … update – what’s on TROVE!

I must confess to a little frustration at the lack of movement in the Geelong Advertiser being loaded into TROVE after the initial couple of updates.  I did ask a couple of questions recently – whether there was any connection between the questions and the recent flurry of updates I honestly can’t say – I’m just VERY grateful that a lot more has been added!

That said, I was then rather confused at the date range of updates and what was really there when you looked at the detail.  I’m sure others may also be confused so I’ve been doing a bit of work identifying what’s really there and what’s only partially there.

The papers that are currently being scanned and added to TROVE are:

 

When you follow the above links you can see each date for each month for each title which “appears” in TROVE.  It is not until you click on a specific date that you either see the first page for that date or you are presented with a message that says “This item is part way through the digitisation process.  It will be available when this page passes the final quality control check.  This is likely to be within the next 1-28 days.”

If you search for an entry in any of the three titles for the Geelong Advertiser, some entries will include the phrase “[coming soon]”.  Click on the “[coming soon]” link and you will be presented with the same message as above.

The following table shows the status of the Geelong Advertiser planned for this digitisation group as at Saturday 3 November 2012.  It shows the date ranges that are fully online and those in the [coming soon] category as not yet fully online.  I will try to update it when I become aware of more dates being completed.

 

Year Date from Date to Title Issues Online Not yet online
1845 Wed 28 May Sat 28 Jun Geelong Advertiser and Squatters’ Advocate [1845-1847] 10  
1845 Wed 2 Jul Wed 31 Dec Geelong Advertiser and Squatters’ Advocate [1845-1847]   42
1846 Sat 3 Jan Wed 30 Dec Geelong Advertiser and Squatters’ Advocate [1845-1847]   100
1847 Sat 2 Jan Tue 26 Oct Geelong Advertiser and Squatters’ Advocate [1845-1847]   76
1847 Fri 29 Oct Tue 28 Dec Geelong Advertiser [1847-1851] 18  
1848 Tue 4 Jan Sat 30 Dec Geelong Advertiser [1847-1851] 127  
1849 ? Jan ? Mar Geelong Advertiser [1847-1851]   ?
1849 Tue 3 Apr Sat 29 Dec Geelong Advertiser [1847-1851] 134  
1850 Tue 1 Jan Fri 30 Aug Geelong Advertiser [1847-1851] 199  
1850 Mon 2 Sep Mon 30 Dec Geelong Advertiser [1847-1851]   94
1851 Wed 1 Jan Fri 31 Oct Geelong Advertiser [1847-1851]   247
1851 Sat 1 Nov Sat 20 Dec Geelong Advertiser [1847-1851] 42  
1851 Mon 22 Dec Wed 31 Dec Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer [1851-1856]   8
1852 Thu 1 Jan Fri 31 Dec Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer [1851-1856]   303
1853 Sat 1 Jan Thu 28 Jul Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer [1851-1856]   178
1853 Mon 1 Aug Sat 31 Dec Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer [1851-1856] 129  
1854 Wed 4 Jan Tue 28 Feb Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer [1851-1856] 48  
1854 Wed 1 Mar Thu 31 Aug Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer [1851-1856]   156
1854 Fri 1 Sep Sat 30 Dec Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer [1851-1856] 103  
1855 Mon 1 Jan Mon 30 Apr Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer [1851-1856] 103  
1855 Tue 1 May Mon 31 Dec Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer [1851-1856]   209
1856 Tue 1 Jan Sat 9 Aug Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer [1851-1856]   187
      TOTAL 913 1600

 

An important thing to keep in mind – there are random dates that have not been digitised at this stage due to missing issues.  Some are odd dates and others are for a range of dates such as Jan-Mar in 1849 – it is hoped that missing issues will be located and added at a later stage.

In the meantime, enjoy searching the 913 issues of the Addy that are already fully digitised and searchable.  And remember that if you’re totally desperate and find a reference during a search that is not yet available online, the Addy is available on microfilm at various locations including the National Library of Australia, State Library of Victoria, Geelong Heritage Centre, Deakin University Waterfront.

Michael Gandy: live in Melbourne

This is a wonderful opportunity for all family historians to experience one of the best genealogical speakers in the world!

Michael Gandy has been to Australia before but to hear him speak you would have had to attend an Australasian Congress held somewhere around Australia or New Zealand.  This would not have been cheap – taking into account transport, accommodation and Congress registration fees.  Now you have a chance to hear Michael give four presentations plus a Q&A session in Melbourne.

The Genealogical Society of Victoria web site includes details of Michael’s presentations and how to book for this great event on Saturday 10th November.

The start and end time have been chosen to enable family historians from country areas to travel to Melbourne, enjoy Michael’s presentations, and get back home again on the same day.

Geelong Advertiser … it’s here!

The first part is here!  So far 1 Nov 1851 – 20 Dec 1851 and I must confess that the first page I looked at was not great quality but there is so much to look forward to.  As you can see from the list below, this is the last part of the second group of papers.

  • Geelong Advertiser and Squatters’ Advocate (28 May 1845-26 Oct 1847)
  • Geelong Advertiser (29 Oct 1847-20 Dec 1851)
  • Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer (22 Dec 1851-9 Aug 1856)

Have a look at Trove Digitised Papers or the summary page.

We can expect notification of additions progressively over the next couple of weeks.

Yippeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!

Geelong Advertiser … 24th June 2012 update!

I think we’ve all been holding our breath after the National Library said [in January 2012] the following would occur …

The papers are currently being scanned and hopefully would be completed by the end of the financial year [June 2012].  The papers in this lot are:

    • Geelong Advertiser and Squatters’ Advocate (28 May 1845-26 Oct 1847)
    • Geelong Advertiser (29 Oct 1847-20 Dec 1851)
    • Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer (22 Dec 1851-9 Aug 1856)

Now for the latest news!

It is so close you can smell it!  If you go to TROVE and search for Geelong Advertiser you’ll see what I mean!  For the results which include the title(s) and date range shown above it also shows the magic words [coming soon].

A layman’s interpretation is the OCR / text part is loaded [or in the process of being loaded] and the images will follow.

The bottom line is that it is VERY CLOSE!

I suggest that everyone gets some extra sleep in preparation for some LONG nights searching the Addy.

And for those that want 1843 or 1857 or later – let’s be very grateful that at least it’s started and there will be more to come.

Peter Bowden aka Peter St Albans

What a fascinating journey of questions, doubts, research and discovery!

Dr Andrew Lemon presented the Don Grant lecture at the Family History Feast almost a year ago, but it was only last weekend that I finally had time to listen to this fascinating presentation and give it the attention it deserved.

To precis it here would not do justice to Andrew’s presentation – to appreciate it to the fullest you should download the podcast from the State Library of Victoria’s website.

It is the story of Peter Bowden, also known as Peter St Albans – an alias acquired from his association with James Wilson and the St Albans stud at Whittington in Geelong.

I must confess that when I had listened to and absorbed the presentation in its entirety I hastened to my Geelong and District web site to see if I had also fallen into the trap of repeating the “story” behind Peter St Albans’ origins!  Thankfully I hadn’t.  The local references I have found certainly support Andrew’s research and hopefully there may be a few that are “new” and can be passed on to support Andrew’s conclusions.

It was pleasing to find references in two local publications that adhered to the facts and did not expand to include the “popular story”.

Brownhill’s The History of Geelong and Corio Bay published in 1955 …

The rider of Briseis in the Melbourne Cup [1876] was Peter Bowden, who was popularly known, because of his association with the St Albans stables, as Peter St Albans.  He died at the home of his father-in-law, William Ryan, at Breakwater, Geelong, in July 1898.  Remarkable testimony of the popularity of the jockey was given at the funeral to the Eastern Cemetery, which was attended by sporting men from Melbourne, Ballarat and other places besides Geelong.  There were 50 vehicles in the funeral procession. [p.524]

In Painters of the past: colonial art and Geelong, published by the Geelong Art Gallery in 1991 …

Frederick Woodhouse 1820-1909 [ … ] In his painting of Briseis, Woodhouse included portraits of the horse’s jockeys, Tom Hales (seated) and Peter Bowden, better known as Peter St Albans.  Hales was Briseis’ usual jockey but, on being placed on Feu d’Artifice in the Cup, was replaced by St Albans, who rode Briseis to victory with Hales coming in second. [p.50]

Give yourself a treat and listen to the podcast!

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