MAJOR additions to database

The GRANT girlsFinally I found the “missing” register of midwives for 1921 – this completes the set of Midwife Registers from 1916 to 1956 from the Victoria Government Gazette.  In the process of indexing it I spotted a familiar name – Lily GRANT, the great aunt of my former partner.  I couldn’t resist including this photo – one of my favourites – it’s Lily with her four sisters. It was taken in 1916 on her younger sister Janet’s wedding day [L-R: Dora, Ethline, Lily, Janet and Mary].  The wedding took place at their home ‘Chesterfield’ at 221 Noble Street, Newtown.  It was five years later, 1921, when Lily was registered as a midwife.  She went on to become a Registered Nurse and eventually ran her own private hospital in Blackburn.

With the Midwives completed, indexing is now progressing on the first six registers for Nurses have now been added to the database – these also continue through to 1956 in the Government Gazette.  These are not all “local” girls as the registers include girls from Melbourne and all over Victoria who did their Nurse Training at Geelong Hospital or Colac Hospital.

But the really BIG addition comes from the PROV Assisted Immigrants to Victoria index.  Over the years we have identified the ships that brought Assisted Immigrants to Geelong, or more specifically Point Henry.  We have extracted all passengers and list references for these ships.  If they landed here, even if they moved on to other areas, they spent at least SOME time in our region.  Many people don’t realise the importance of some of these “duplicate” passenger lists – some identify passengers who were eventually moved from the ship at Point Henry to the Immigration Depot in Geelong.

Although many of these entries are available through PROV, Ancestry, Findmypast etc. this database gives you different options for searching that might help find that elusive ancestor.  Make sure you read the Search Tips to understand the string, wildcard and group search options.

As an example, search for:

INDEX ENTRY     bridg

TITLE                      immig

and you will find lots of entries for Bridget etc. but not just from this new Assisted Immigrants index – you will also find local entries from Assisted Immigrants Remittances; Orphan Immigrants; Immigration Depot Funerals; and Immigration Depot Returns.  Leave out the title to find other local entries from almost 140 indexes in the database.

We now have 1,478,815 records in the Geelong and District database.  I thought 1.5 million entries by the end of 2014 would be a challenge but hopefully an achievable target.  So much for that theory!  We have no excuse for not achieving that target now!  After I’ve taken a breath I need to start working on the Unassisted Immigrants who landed at Point Henry / Geelong.  This is what’s been added since the last major update on 27 December 2013:

  • Geelong District: Assisted Immigrants – limited PROV index – 39,202 entries
  • Geelong District: Midwives from the Victoria Government Gazette 1921 – 36 entries
  • Geelong District: Nurses from the Victoria Government Gazette 1925-1930 – 355 entries

Details on these indexes can be found in the Geelong & District Potpourri pages and the Geelong & District List of Books.

And don’t forget to search again for your ancestors in the Geelong & District Database – they could have been in the last load of additions!

Latest additions to database

Geelong Infirmary and Benevolent Asylum in1866Geelong Hospital again features in the latest additions to the Geelong and District database with another index of an Annual Report – this time for 1910.  I’d forgotten how much useful information was printed in these Annual Reports.  They don’t include name of patients or inmates but the really useful section covers subscriptions.  These were akin to our present day Medicare – public health!  There are pages of names, usually grouped under employers, of employees who were covered by these contributions which entitled them to Subscription Tickets or Inpatients Tickets for medical care.

These lists are quite extensive and provide data not normally available from other sources.  In addition to the many names listed and indexed, many are just initials.  If you suspect your ancestor worked at a particular trade or on a particular property in the country in Geelong & District, have a look at the actual report as they may be listed by initials only.  Could they be B.P., or J.K. who were butchers at the Geelong Freezing Works?  Or perhaps A.G.P. or T.L.W. who worked for Hawkes Brothers?

Numerous other indexes from the Geelong Family History Group collection and our volunteers are also included.

We now have 1,439,222 records in the Geelong and District database.  This is what’s been added since the last major update on 21 December:

  • Geelong: Infirmary & Benevolent Asylum Annual Report 1910 – 2,776 entries
  • Geelong: Infirmary & Benevolent Asylum Annual Report 1920 – 2,122 entries
  • Geelong: Geelong Advertiser – Trades and Businesses 1840-1851 – 1,767 entries
  • Geelong District: Names from the Geelong Times – 814 entries
  • Geelong District: Geelong Times – Admissions to Geelong Hospital 1874 – 152 entries
  • Geelong District: Geelong Court of Insolvency c1854-1933 [VPRS 815] – 83 entries
  • Geelong District: select land files from various VPRS at PROV – 33 entries

Details on these indexes can be found in the Geelong & District Potpourri pages and the Geelong & District List of Books.

And don’t forget to search again for your ancestors in the Geelong & District Database – they could have been in the last load of additions!

Latest additions to database

Queenscliff and Point NepeanMost people would question why Portsea, Sorrento and parts of the Mornington Peninsula are included in “Geelong and District” and more particularly the Geelong & District Database.

Perhaps we should look closer at the newspaper the Queenscliff Sentinel – which at various times during the 20th Century was known as … the Queenscliff sentinel, Drysdale, Portarlington & Sorrento advertiser and also the Queenscliff sentinel, Drysdale, St Leonards, Sorrento, Portsea, Portarlington, Point Lonsdale and Bellarine Shire advertiser!

There are already plenty of names in the Geelong & District Database from Portsea, Sorrento and Rye – from early church registers of Queenscliff – right through into the 21st century!  Doctors, pilots, customs officers, military and many others crossed the short distance from Queenscliff to the lower Mornington Peninsula to service the needs of the people living there from choice or at the Quarantine facilities.

Have you thought about how you can help us reach our 2014 target of 1,500,000 entries in the Geelong & District Database?

These are the book indexes that have been added this time around.  We now have 1,429,520 records in the Geelong and District database.  This is what’s been added since the last major update on 15 December:

  • The Peninsula Story Book 1: Sorrento and Portsea – yesterday – Book – 543 entries
  • The Peninsula Story Book 2: Hell to Health – the history of Quarantine at Port Phillip Heads 1852-1966 – Book – 373 entries
  • A Pictorial History of Linton 1839-1989 – Book – 1,039 entries

Details on these indexes can be found in the Geelong & District List of Books.

And don’t forget to search again for your ancestors in the Geelong & District Database – they could have been in the last load of additions!

Latest additions to Geelong and district database

Berry Bank HomesteadMack’s Hotel and Berry Bank Homestead are two names closely associated with Joseph Gardner MACK – a very early settler in Geelong.  Chain of Ponds gives a wonderful insight into this early pioneer and his family – well worth indexing.

Another gem is the huge index to A Whirr of Many Wheels – many thanks to Rod Charles for providing this index from his award winning book.

These are the book indexes that have been added this time around.  We now have 1,429,520 records in the Geelong and District database.  This is what’s been added since the last major update on 8 December:

  • Chain of Ponds: a narrative of a Victorian Pioneer – Book – 975 entries
  • The Todd Journal – Book – 341 entries
  • A Whirr of Many Wheels: cycling in Geelong, Volume 1, 1869 to 1914 – Book – 1,767 entries

Details on these indexes can be found in the Geelong & District List of Books.

And don’t forget to search again for your ancestors in the Geelong & District Database – they could have been in the last load of additions!

Latest additions and new target

2014 TargetIt’s almost the end of 2013 and time to set a new target for the number of entries in the Geelong and District database1.5 Million sounds like a nice round number – can we achieve that by December 2014?

Half a dozen new book indexes have been added this time around.  We now have 1,426,437 records in the Geelong and District database.  This is what’s been added since the last major update on 8 December:

  • We the Otway Pioneers – Book – 39 entries
  • Pitfield and Bulldog, Western Creek – Vol 1 in the Woady Yaloak Historical Society series by J G Roberts – Book – 334 entries
  • Smythe’s Creek and Smythesdale – Vol 2 in the Woady Yaloak Historical Society series by J G Roberts – Book – 619 entries
  • Piggoreet Devils Kitchen and Melville’s Cave – Vol 3 in the Woady Yaloak Historical Society series by J G Roberts – Book – 362 entries
  • Brown’s Diggings – Vol 4 in the Woady Yaloak Historical Society series by J G Roberts – Book – 725 entries
  • Happy Valley – Vol 5 in the Woady Yaloak Historical Society series by J G Roberts – Book – 412 entries

Details on these indexes can be found in the Geelong & District List of Books.

And don’t forget to search again for your ancestors in the Geelong & District Database – they could have been in the last load of additions!

Not that hard: visiting the Geelong Heritage Centre

Geelong Heritage CentreI’ve heard on the grapevine that regular visitors to the Geelong Heritage Centre in the former Little Malop Street building have not started appearing at the new location in the National Wool Museum in Moorabool Street.

Despite working in Melbourne 5 days a week, I managed to visit the “new” Geelong Heritage Centre last week – I wasn’t sure what to expect but what a pleasant surprise – you don’t know what you’re missing!

This blog isn’t about repeating the information on the GHC web site – it’s aimed at making you feel comfortable about dropping in to the new centre for a visit and some research.  Explore the web site of the GHC to find out all the details: opening times, services, activities, events, bookshop, catalogue and much more.  And hopefully you won’t miss the great news that the new Geelong Heritage Centre is open FIVE days a week from 10.00 am.

Join me on my journey to the “new” Geelong Heritage Centre …

THE OLD GEELONG HERITAGE CENTRE:

If you mistakenly go to the Old Geelong Heritage Centre site, this is what you would have been greeted with in November 2013.  It looks pretty forlorn but you’ll have a chance to see the artist’s impression of the magnificent new building for the Geelong Regional Library and the Geelong Heritage Centre.

 Old Geelong Heritage Centre site  Old Geelong Heritage Centre site  Old Geelong Heritage Centre site

If you’re standing looking at this and cursing at anyone you can think of, don’t get too frustrated – the location of the “new” centre is not that far away.

GETTING TO THE “NEW” GEELONG HERITAGE CENTRE:

Make your way to the north east corner of Johnstone Park – on the way, enjoy the view of the Peace Memorial, Geelong Art Gallery and the Geelong Town Hall.  It’s amazing how many people haven’t seen these beautiful buildings from this angle.

From the corner of the Park, walk along Malop Street to the next intersection [Moorabool Street], turn left and before you get to the next intersection [Brougham Street] you’ll be at the site of the “new” Geelong Heritage Centre.

OTHER WAYS OF GETTING THERE:

There are also Park & Ride options in Geelong that you might find helpful.

The City of Greater Geelong also runs a Central Geelong Free Summer Shuttle Service that stops at the train station, the Waterfront, Geelong Botanic Gardens and other Central Geelong locations.  Contact the City or Tourist Information Centres for details.

THE “NEW” [INTERIM] GEELONG HERITAGE CENTRE – WHERE:

Top Floor, National Wool Museum

26 Moorabool Street, Geelong

HOW TO FIND THE GHC at the NATIONAL WOOL MUSEUM:

The GHC is located on the top [third] floor of the National Wool Museum [below left, centre and right]

Go through the main doors between the National Wool Museum [red] and Geelong Heritage Centre [blue] banners.  [below centre and right]

 "New" Geelong Heritage Centre  "New" Geelong Heritage Centre  "New" Geelong Heritage Centre

Once you are through the doors, go to the desk on your left [below left].  Ask for your pass to go up to the Geelong Heritage Centre [below right].  You must wear this pass while you are in the building to use the Geelong Heritage Centre otherwise you will be asked to purchase a ticket for the National Wool Museum.  Don’t forget to return your lanyard and pass to the desk on your way out.

 GHC Front Desk  GHC Pass for all visitors

Access to the top floor is via the ramp through the National Wool Museum.  Go straight to the Geelong Heritage Centre – your pass is not a ticket to the Wool Museum!  The ramp is a very gentle slope to the top floor – if you have any concerns, ask at the front desk for a wheelchair.  Wool Museum volunteers cannot wheel you up to the Geelong Heritage Centre – you will need to be accompanied by someone who can help you.

Continue up the ramp until you see the huge stack of wool bales [below left], go up the ramp with the bales on your right [below centre] and you will notice two entrances in front of you [below right].

GHC Top Floor GHC Top Floor OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Go to the entrance on the left first as this contains the lockers [above right].

No bags are permitted in the Heritage Centre Reading Room so they should be placed in one of the lockers provided [below left].  Remember to take your key with you and keep it in a safe place.  Only pencils are permitted in the centre – if you don’t have one, you will find some in the Reading Room.

 GHC Lockers  GHC Entrance

Return to the entrance on the right [above right], go through the entrance and turn right.

INSIDE THE GEELONG HERITAGE CENTRE READING ROOM:

The reception / enquiry desk is on your left inside the Reading Room, just past the shelves of publications for sale [below left].

Report to the desk [below left] and make sure you know how and where to find resources.

IMPORTANT: The Reading Room is on three levels with a few steps on each side of the room between each level.  There are good solid rails to hold as you move up or down the steps but if you feel you might have difficulty please speak to those on duty.  Where possible they will bring items to you for viewing on the top [entrance] level so you don’t have to use the steps.

 GHC Reception  GHC Reading Room  GHC Reading Room

From the entrance:

  • rows of bookshelves are on the right of the Reading Room on all levels [above right and below left and right]
  • computers, tables and chairs are on the left on the middle level [above centre and right]
  • microfiche, microfilms and readers are on the left on the lower level [below left and right].
 GHC Reading Room

 GHC Reading Room

The new Reading Room contains most of what was available in the old [demolished] Reading Room.

WHAT ISN’T IN THE “NEW” GHC READING ROOM:

There is no direct access to the Archives at the GHC Reading Room.  Mind you, very few people ever used these archives in the old [demolished] centre – and only PART of the Archives were held in Little Malop Street anyway!

It was Murphy’s Law that the item you wanted to view was stored off-site in which case you needed to order it in advance and wait for it to be available [a couple of weeks].  So really, nothing has changed!

Make use of the GHC web site to search the Archives and order the relevant item(s) or check to ensure that what you want to view is available when you visit.  And don’t forget that many of the more popular archives have been filmed and are available to view on microfilm in the “new” Heritage Centre.

The GHC now has a terrific new scanner which means items on film or fiche can be scanned and saved as an image – don’t forget to bring your USB drive with you!

ENJOY YOUR VISIT TO THE “NEW” GEELONG HERITAGE CENTRE:

Without doubt, the “new” / interim Geelong Heritage Centre Reading Room is absolutely delightful.  It’s fresh, well laid out, and very inviting.  Do yourself a favour and drop in for some research.

GEELONG REGIONAL LIBRARY:

If you’re still standing at the demolition site in Little Malop Street and wondering where the library has gone, just look behind you – it’s in the Government Offices – the upside down pyramid building [below right].

 Geelong Regional Library  Geelong Regional Library

Update on Geelong Advertiser on TROVE

Geelong Advertiser 9 January 1841 p1It’s so much fun watching the progress of the Geelong Advertiser through TROVE – the anticipation is mounting!  Priority has been given to the years 1914-1918 and this is what has already been completed and available online:

  • 8 Jan 1914 – 24 May 1915
  • 17 Dec 1915 – 31 Mar 1916
  • 14 May 1917 – 31 Dec 1918

And checking the ones still to come, they’re VERY close!  They appear to have been digitised and searches during this period will find the entries marked as [Coming Soon]:

  • 26 May 1915 – 16 Dec 1915 [6,101 entries "coming soon"]
  • 1 Apr 1916 – 13 May 1917 [11,340 entries "coming soon"]

So you know what that means!  Once those ones are finished, they’ll be starting on the rest of the promised Geelong Advertisers … it is so reassuring to look at the NEW TITLES COMING list for the current year:

The following titles are intended to be made available to the public during the coming year [July 2013 to June 2014]. Multiple titles may be processed and made available at any given time. Dates of when specific issues will be available unfortunately cannot be provided.

And find this entry:

Geelong Advertiser 1857 – 1918 National Library of Australia and selected by Australian Newspaper Plan libraries

And when that’s all done we’ll have a complete run from 1840-1918.

And while we’re holding our breath with excitement, I found this reference to the Addy in a book I was indexing – oh how politically INCORRECT our newspapers used to be!

 

14 May 1942 – Tobacco Shortage Hits Councillors

Cigarettes will in future grace the Bannockburn Council table in place of cigars.  The supply of the latter has run out and as replacement cost is 2 pounds 8 shillings a box, no more will be purchased.  Those Councillors who do not smoke the humble cigarette can, if they so desire, provide their own cigars.  But as Bannockburn is largely composed of Scotchmen, the risk of that is not great.

And before ANYONE complains, that is a direct quote and not something I would DARE to say in mixed company!

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